What Is Social Franchising?

What Is Social Franchising

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While most of us are familiar with the term “franchising” and associate with the likes of McDonalds, Pizza Hut, Meineke, social franchising is a less well known term, for now anyway.  You will soon hear more of it as non-profit organizations are increasingly adapting business tools such as franchising to scale their successful social projects for greater impact over larger geographic areas. As “social” relates to communities, human society and their welfare, they cover the spectrum from economics, social well-being to the environment.

Why Social Franchising Is Happening

The work of non-profit organizations often tend to address current challenges at the local level but then, rarely reach their full potential to help environments elsewhere. What happens then is that the search for solutions for similar problems are often reinvented many times over. This ends up, wasting precious resources which these organizations lack in the first place.

Our Knowledge Age, wherein knowledge and ideas are the source of economic growth, is the catalyst to help unlock these hidden potential. We now have access to a diverse and rich body of information and resources from which we can learn and use to develop programs to help improve our community’s health, education, utilities, infrastructure, environment and/or social needs. Better still, these various systems of success formulas and best practices can be replicated to communities across the nation or even worldwide.

Entities With A Social Purpose

In the strictest sense of the word, social franchising originated with charities that had a need to efficiently extend health services such as: family planning, reproductive health services, maternal and child health services, and tuberculosis diagnosis, and treatment, to thousands of under served communities in developing countries such as Pakistan.

On the other hand, there are franchises such as DetailXPerts that is rooted with a bigger picture social purpose that extends beyond just the bottom line. Although it is not a non-profit organization, there are three principles at the core of its philosophy that are closely aligned to the above mentioned social context.

Firstly, they believe in safeguarding the economic health of the local communities in which they serve, with their capability to create job opportunities in the best and worst of economic times. Secondly, their detailing technology is designed to minimize the use and thus, the wastage of one of our primary natural resource, water. This then leads to the third principle, which is the preservation of our environment.

As it is, when it comes to the environment, everyone knowingly or unknowingly has a share – be it little or large – towards its deterioration, improvement or recovery. While one organization cannot undo the accumulated damage overnight, they can at least raise the level of awareness and to help retard the pace of deterioration by rolling out their green systems and practices to communities nationwide.

Even though charities are non-profit and rely on donations to facilitate their social causes, many have found that to be unsustainable in times of economic hardship. Therefore, they too have to branch out to include other goods and/or services that ensure they have steady revenue streams to sustain their primary mission.

As such, you can say that social franchising has a social purpose and is owned by its social franchise members but it is can also be a business that makes profits. Because without these profits, they could not survive, grow and meet the aims of their social programs.

If you are interested to own a business that has strong social franchising undertones, look no further than our DetailXPerts opportunity. We are proud to be an organization that is focused on the much bigger picture of job creation and eco-friendly interests as oppose to strictly profits.

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